Posted 21 hours ago
malacanan:

When Aguinaldo wrote to General Anderson about really really liking frozen yogurt at Pinkberry and weekend Bikram session, General Anderson replied via snapchat the following photo. Aguinaldo then replied, in a long handwritten letter, saying things like: “Why are you such a judger?” and “Don’t hate me cause you ain’t me!” General Anderson, master of snapchat, again, replied the same image.

Rediscover the bloody conflict at the turn of the 20th century, known as the Philippine-American War, through our graphic timeline here.

malacanan:

When Aguinaldo wrote to General Anderson about really really liking frozen yogurt at Pinkberry and weekend Bikram session, General Anderson replied via snapchat the following photo. Aguinaldo then replied, in a long handwritten letter, saying things like: “Why are you such a judger?” and “Don’t hate me cause you ain’t me!” General Anderson, master of snapchat, again, replied the same image.

Rediscover the bloody conflict at the turn of the 20th century, known as the Philippine-American War, through our graphic timeline here.

Posted 1 day ago
explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

Posted 1 day ago

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

Posted 1 day ago

caelas:

saying feminism is unnecessary because you don’t feel oppressed is like saying fire extinguishers are unnecessary because your house isn’t on fire

Posted 1 day ago

myers-briggs personality types

↳ INFJ (The Counselor)

INFJs often appear quiet, caring and sensitive, and may be found listening attentively to someone else’s ideas or concerns. They are highly perceptive about people and want to help others achieve understanding. INFJs are not afraid of complex personal problems; in fact, they are quite complex themselves, and have a rich inner life that few are privy to. They reflect at length on issues of ethics, and feel things deeply. Because Counselors initially appear so gentle and reserved, they may surprise others with their intensity when one of their values is threatened or called into question. Their calm exterior belies the complexity of their inner worlds.

Because INFJs are such complex people, they may be reluctant to engage with others who might not understand or appreciate them, and can thus be hard to get to know. Although they want to get along with others and support them in their goals, they are fiercely loyal to their own system of values and will not follow others down a path that does not feel authentic to them. When they sense that their values are not being respected, or when their intuition tells them that someone’s intentions are not pure, they are likely to withdraw.

Trivia:

  • least common type in the population
  • among highest of all types in college GPA
  • among most likely to stay in college
  • most likely of all types to cope with stress by seeing a therapist
  • highest of all types in marital dissatisfaction
  • personal values include spirituality, learning, and community service
  • commonly found in careers in religion, counseling, teaching, and the arts
  • famous infjs: gandhi, carl jung, eleanor roosevelt, and emily bronte
Posted 1 day ago

R.I.P. Amy Winehouse (September 14, 1983 - July 23, 2011)

(Source: serfbwort)

Posted 2 days ago

unskinny:

I hope Miss Claudette is okay.

Posted 2 days ago

iguanamouth:

youre gonna look so goddamn cool

this took an unexpected (but great) turn

Posted 2 days ago

hopelesshoping:

Suzanne Warren is a deep thinker & I love her 

Posted 3 days ago